January 2008


[Digital nations in the making: Update Page 6 – Community Grid for Learning]

A couple of weeks ago I was at an event in Oxford evaluating a beta version of Phoebe, a learning design tool which could have substantial potential for adult and continuing education and FE. When there’s so much out there already, is there room for more? Yes I think so, but I’ll backtrack a bit to explain why.

When we set up a server and website in the WEA Manchester office in 1996 with a high speed JANET link, I was excited at the prospect of developing a distributed learning network. Our tutors were isolated, working in many separate centres. Our small staff team, spread thinly, was stretched to provide even limited support.

The potential was there to build a new kind of learning community – sharing resources, collaborating, swapping experiences, building on good practice. An early diagram showed how we intended to link up provision in unemployed centres, libraries and community venues.

Bringing life to this early adult education electronic network was stimulating but slow. It led however in 2002 to our setting up with partners the Community Grid for Learning (CGfL) to develop networked learning with a strong social inclusion focus.

The CGfL website (www.learners.org.uk) still has good interactive courses, games and activities to stimulate learners, but funding dried up; and although over 2000 people enrolled for this online learning, there’s been only limited use of the material by tutors.

Since then learning platforms like Moodle and Blackboard have been widely introduced across all sectors and these have started to make us think how best to use a distributed network, holding course modules, video clips, assignments, web links etc. But they still haven’t gone far enough to transform the way that most tutors plan, design and run their courses.

Which is where Phoebe comes in . The tool has been developed by Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education (DCE) in response to a JISC Design for Learning (DfL) funding programme,  where DfL was (2004) described as “an appropriate balance between  e-learning and other modes of delivery.”

Liz Masterman from the University’s Computer Services Department describes its intended use as being for “initial teacher training, staff development and as a productivity tool and source of inspiration”.

As Marion Manton, the Phoebe coordinator at DCE explained, the central focus of the tool is the Design Template area. One of three existing levels can be used – basic, medium and advanced – or these can be altered for individual needs. Users can save their design for themselves – or for public use, allowing others to build incrementally on what they have created. In short there’s a learning community in the making here.

It’s a simple idea, but this is its strength; and the different sections of the tool are supported by help and context material immediately available. There’s a link to a del.icio.us Phoebe site for educause updates; and there are sections like “What can I do with a particular tool?” with alphabetically listed answers and “What technology can I use for …?”. Examples in the latter list include ‘Receive information’, ‘Define problem’, ‘Research’, ‘Analyse information’ etc and then indicates the technologies to consider using for each instance.

Discussions at the meeting indicated that most participants could see a use for the tool. It was better than a Word document or spreadsheet because it had so much other support material available to draw on; and enabled users to build on others’ work. It could make more use of social networking tools to encourage more sharing and communication between tutors – similar to what I was describing in my last post about LiquidPlanner – but these features could be added at a later stage.

Phoebe will be available for institutions to download onto their own servers and customise according to their own needs, but a question arose here about how that would affect the availability and updating of the help and support material. This issue will need a resolution. Phoebe is still in its design phase and will require additional funding to support this in the short term; as well as a business model to ensure its sustainability in the long term.

If you want to take a look, contact Marion Manton (marion.manton@conted.ox.ac.uk) at DCE, who will be pleased to supply you with a password for reviewing Phoebe.

Advertisements

I’ve been offline for blogging for the last three months, but a visit to Seattle and the West coast over the New Year has got me moving again. Moving also between different online and offline communities – united by their close involvement with and use of the web to maintain their activities and lifestyles.

Seattle car drivers I know make good use of online road reports to avoid traffic jams; but in winter the skiers join in, piling into their cars as sites like the North West Avalanche Centre  provide detailed forecasts and hourly data about snowfall, temperatures and risks in the Cascade resorts of Snoqualmie, Stevens Pass and Crystal Mountain, all within reach even after a day’s work.

If you’re not so keen on snow-clad bare mountains, the continent’s West coast has warmer attractions too, as the photos below of sunrises for the first 6 days of 2008 show. (Taken in La Ventana, 30 miles south of La Paz). Day temperatures were up to 27° C.

Five separate sunrises in La Ventana, Baja Peninsula, Mexico in the first week of January 2008.

Visiting Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, a two hour flight from Los Angeles, I met up with members of two partly overlapping communities – the surfers and the windsurfers/kiteboarders. Critically reliant on the power of the waves and the winds, both groups are highly dependent on good advice on weather & wind patterns and accurate websites for up to date information.

 All you need is a laptop or a mobile internet device.  www.Iwindsurf.com for instance provides live windcams  and realtime wind speed and direction graphs for selected areas; while surfline.com carries crucial information on the arrival of swell trains travelling across the Pacific. Both sites have forums and gear sections.

Surfers it is said are a bit more cagey about where to find the best conditions as there is only one ‘sweet spot’ on a breaking wave and will go to great lengths to find uncrowded breaks. The world of windsurfers and kiteboarders seems more open. There’s a hard core of them, very relaxed, who are always meeting up according to Marie-Christine Leclerc, a kiteboard instructor, who winters down south in Baja and travels north for the summer to run her Elevation Kiteboarding School, at Nitinat Lake, north of Victoria on Vancouver Island.

Back in Seattle after the New Year break, the pace is much brisker, at least in the internet start up sector, as I found out when invited to a briefing event at LiquidPlanner.  They are building some innovative online project management and scheduling software with integrated collaborative and social networking tools and were meeting with potential investors. LiquidPlanner aims to capture the uncertainty inherent in projects through the use of ranged rather than point estimates – an idea explored in more detail by Bruce Henry, the company’s “Director of Rocket Science” in a recent blog posting.

“Project management is a social exercise.” Charles Seybold, LiquidPlanner’s CEO told us. “The key for our product is to help people manage uncertainty.” That sounded familiar and not so different from the world of education!  With a fair wind behind them, it will be interesting to see where Charles and his team have got to in 18 months’ time. In the meantime they are launching the product at the DEMO emerging technologies conference in California at the end of this month.